Go with The Odds, Not The Oddballs

Let’s say you’re assigned to market fabric to consumers, and you
know little about cloth. You can at least think, “Lots more women will
buy this fabric than men.” It’s beyond dispute.
Advertising for Results.

Let’s say you’re assigned to market fabric to consumers, and you
know little about cloth. You can at least think, “Lots more women will
buy this fabric than men.” It’s beyond dispute.
Advertising for Results
Gathering
Despite this, coworker Solex Ample says, “My Uncle Lircaw buys a
lot of fabric, so I think we should market to men as well.” Hmph. Lex,
your uncle is an exception, and you shouldn’t let his situation dominate
your judgment.
If Solex presses the issue, ask him this: “What do you think is the
percentage of men who buy fabric?” Solex might respond, “I have no
idea. Maybe we should do a study. Sol, there’s no time for that! The fact
is: You’re paid to make strong assessments when you have scant
information. So, please: Use some common sense now.
Above all, don’t let screwball opinions stop your progress. It’s
serious. If you follow people who have zero marketing sense, the
advertising will fail.

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