Napoleon Abusing the Animals

On Animal Farm by George Orwell.

Those who say that power cannot corrupt a person never had enough to know what it’s like. The pigs in this book started out by being fairer than Mr. Jones but in the end they got corrupted to a leader worse than him. This essay will explain how the animals in “Animal Farm” abused their power over the less intelligent animals to their advantage. Napoleon had abused the other animals by using violence, by spreading propaganda and took food for himself that all the animals dissolved. This essay will explain how the animals in “Animal Farm” abused their power over the dumber animals to their advantage. Napoleon had taken food for himself that all the animals deserved.
He used the other animals by using violence, by spreading propaganda and took food for himself and the pigs.
 
Napoleon, who is the leader of the farm, uses the dogs that he trained to scare the other animals by turning the dogs on them.    
Napoleon stood up and, casting a peculiar sidelong look at Snowball, uttered a high-pitched whimper of a kind no one had ever heard him utter before. At this time there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs wearing brass-studded collars come bounding into the barn. They dashed strait for Snowball (Orwell, 2000, page 35).
In this quote Napoleon uses the dogs to chase out Snowball so that he will be the leader. This counts as violence because Snowball runs because he is scared of getting killed by the dogs. Napoleon also uses violence to scare the other animals when he executes the animals that confess to their crimes against animal farm. “The three hens that had been the ring leaders in the attempted rebellion now came forward and stated that Napoleon had appeared to them in a dream and incited them to disobey napoleons orders.”  (Orwell, 2000, page 56) Snowball now breaks one of the rules and kills the animals that rebel against him. This clears out any opposition from the animal farm and scares the other animals into obeying him. However Napoleon doesn’t just use violence to persuade the animals into obeying him.

Napoleon is a communist leader and like a communist, he uses propaganda to influence the other animals to follow him.”It is no longer needed, comrade said Squealer stiffly. The Beasts of England was a song of the Rebellion. But the Rebellion is now completed.” (Orwell, 2000, page 58) Napoleon told Squealer to ban “The Beasts of England” because it was a song of the rebellion and if the animals realized that Napoleon was treating them worse than Mr. Jones they could use the song as a driving force to drive Napoleon out. Napoleon also had Squealer convince the dumber animals that the original quote was not “Four legs good, two legs bad” but his new saying. “All the sheep burst out into a tremendous bleating of four legs good, two legs better!” Squealer had convinced the dumb sheep that two legs were better than four. This is a form of propaganda because the sheep will serve to induce the other animals into thinking the same. Propaganda and violence are not Napoleons only tools at the farm he also abuses his power with his greed.

Napoleon also abused his power by taking all the animals’ food for him and for the other pigs, and sold it for money that he used on himself.”Milk and apples (this has been proven by science, comrades)    contains substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers.” In this quote Squealer explained to the other animals that they needed the milk because they needed it for their “brains”. This is an example of abuse of power because the pigs are treating themselves better than the others simply because they can. Napoleon also had his hardest worker, Boxer killed and sold to the glue maker so they could buy more alcohol for themselves.
“And word went round that from somewhere or other the pigs had acquired the money to buy themselves another case of whiskey.”From this quote it is clear that the pigs had sold Boxer and bought the whiskey with the money that they had gotten from the sale.

Clearly Napoleon and the pigs had abused their power by scaring the other animals with violence by killing them, and threatening them with dogs. Spreading propaganda so that the other animals would listen to them and convincing the unintelligent sheep into convincing the other animals. They also took the other animals food for themselves while the other animals starved. Napoleon had abused the other animals for his and the other pigs. Unfortunately the other animals were not smart enough to realize that the pigs were using them. In the end this book proves power can corrupt a person even if they think that it can’t.

References
Orwell, G. (2000). Animal Farm, London, England: Penguin Books

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3 Comments
  1. ladybaby
    Posted May 13, 2009 at 12:31 pm

    Very interesting. Yes it is true that POWER can corrupt a person even if they think it can’t. Put a uniform on a person, and see how differently they act. They don’t see it, but those who know them see it.

  2. Makarov Kinchenko
    Posted May 28, 2011 at 12:00 am

    This is good

  3. blob face
    Posted September 15, 2012 at 3:05 am

    You’ve got some stuff wrong, probably just name mix ups, but:
    “The three hens that had been the ring leaders in the attempted rebellion now came forward and stated that Napoleon **should be snowball** had appeared to them in a dream and incited them to disobey napoleons orders.” (Orwell, 2000, page 56) Snowball **Should be Napoleon** now breaks one of the rules and kills the animals that rebel against him.

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