To Kill a Mockingbird – Chapters 20, 21 and 22 Summary and Analysis

Mr. Dolphus Raymond reveals that he is drinking from paper bags. He commiserates with Dill and offers him a drink in a paper bag. Dill slurps some liquid and Scout warns him that much, but Dill shows him that drinking alcohol is not only Coca-Cola. Mr. Raymond tells the children that pretending to be drunk, the other white people, the explanation for his lifestyle, when in fact he just prefer black people white.

Summary: Chapter 20

Mr. Dolphus Raymond reveals that he is drinking from paper bags. He commiserates with Dill and offers him a drink in a paper bag. Dill slurps some liquid and Scout warns him that much, but Dill shows him that drinking alcohol is not only Coca-Cola. Mr. Raymond tells the children that pretending to be drunk, the other white people, the explanation for his lifestyle, when in fact he just prefer black people white.

  
When Dill and Scout return to the courtroom, Atticus makes his final appearance. Graduate and go over the evidence now is a personal appeal to the jury. He points out that the prosecution has brought medical evidence of criminal activity and present only the shaky testimony of two unreliable witnesses and, moreover, the physical evidence suggests that Bob Ewell, not Tom Robinson, beat Mayella. He then offers his own version of events, describing how Mayella, lonely and unhappy, committed the taboo act longed for a black man and then hid his shame by accusing him of rape after being caught. Atticus begs the jury to avoid the State premise that all black people are criminals and deliver justice by exempting Tom Robinson. Once the end Atticus, Calpurnia comes into the courtroom.

Summary: Chapter 21

Calpurnia hands Atticus note told him that his children were home by noon. Mr. Underwood says that Jem and Scout in colored balcony and there since just after one this afternoon. Atticus tells them to go home and dinner. I should be able to hear the verdict, Atticus says that they can return after dinner, he knows that the jury will likely return to that time.

Calpurnia marches Jem, Scout and Dill home. They eat quickly and return to find the jury still out, even in a courtroom full. Evening comes, night falls, and the jury deliberate further. Jem is confident of victory, while Dill has fallen asleep. Finally, after eleven at night, the jury enters. Scout remembers that a jury never looks at a person is convicted, and she finds that twelve men, do not look at Tom Robinson as a file and deliver a verdict of guilt. Courtroom will be interpreted, and as Atticus goes out each color balcony growth gesture of respect.

Summary: Chapter 22

That night, Jem cries, railing against injustice appeal. The next day, Maycomb black population delivers an avalanche of food Finch household. Outside Miss Stephanie Crawford is gossiping with Mr. Avery and Miss Maudie, and she tries to question Jem and Scout on the court. Miss Maudie rescues children ask them some cake. Jem complains that his illusions about Maycomb were breaking: I think that these people were the best in the world, but after seeing the court, he does not think so anymore. Miss Maudie points out that there were people who tried to help, like Judge Taylor, who was called Atticus if instead of regular public defender.He adds that the jury is to stay out as long as a sign of progress in race relations. When children leave Miss Maudie house, Miss Stephanie goes to tell them that Bob Ewell said to his father that morning, spat on him, and swore revenge.

Analysis: Chapters 20-22

It is easy to criticize Mr. Dolphus Raymond as unrealistic saccharinely nonracist character. Indeed, the temporal and geographical environment in which the white community as a whole has so little understanding of the blacks, Raymond is not only unusual but also a bit absurd, it seems that a fair and morally upstanding Atticus View Raymond may be a violation of accepted notions of social suitability. The importance of the character of Raymond lies in the nature that prefers black. Raymond never explains why, as he prefers blacks, just makes a similarly white community never explains why, hates blacks, it just does. The difference between these two deep-rooted attitudes, however, is that while the White Community imposes its preferences unapologetically to the whole Maycomb, Raymond acts on his preferences just because he wants to do so, not because he wants to dictate how others live.

  
Mr. Raymond presence outside the judicial hall is appropriate: as Miss Maudie, that does not fall into the rest of the white people because he does not share their guilt. Mr. Raymond is a harsh realist, although Jem shares outrage that is too old to cry. In a way, Mr. Raymond is another example of an innocent destroyed by hatred and prejudice: a moral and conscientious person, he is also unhappy figure, a good man who has proved cynical and lost hope after it proved too much evil in the world. ”You have not seen enough in the world is,” says Scout, commenting on how special and a good father is innocent and her faith in human goodness.”You have not seen this city, but all you have to do is step back into the courthouse.”

While Mr. Raymond believes that Maycomb is a racist party is the real Maycomb, Atticus, less resentful, seems to hold hope for the city, well, his eloquent closing argument is simple desperation. On the contrary, says the jury to trust and respect, forcing them to find self-confidence and dignity in itself. Although To Kill a Mockingbird dramatizes the threat to good and evil, and although it is often treated with this topic is travel via the destruction of innocence, the novel is the highest moral outlook is depressing, but is characterized by wise understanding Atticus is like goodness and badness within people. Moral issues in the novel are often black and white, with a clear good side and evil side clear, but the conclusion of the novel about a man is not so simple. In contrast, Atticus understands that people are able to very good and great evil, which will prove key to his admirable moral strength. Unlike Outlook for the children, Atticus understanding of the world is not innocent: does not believe in good only because they have never seen evil. It has actually seen and experienced evil, but is nevertheless capable of belief in the virtues of humanity. This belief is an adult perspective, which is Scout, a novel that begins as an innocent child, the urge to move the story forward. Although the jury strikes blow prejudices in condemning it, is it still possible that the city is morally blameless adult character is holding hope. Even after the verdict was delivered, it is felt that progress is being made: as Miss Maudie says, the city adopted a “step-it’s only a baby step, but it’s a step.”

Jem, but is unable to see things this way. Scout is confused verdict, but like Atticus, that is durable and maintain its positive view of the world. Her brother is crushed: his dearly held illusions about justice and law are in ruins. In a way I eat, like Tom Robinson, a Mockingbird. While the Ewells and the forces of hatred and prejudice do not take life, doing strip him of his childhood and youthful idealism.

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